User to user discussion and support for UltraEdit, UEStudio, UltraCompare, and other IDM applications.

Projects, workspaces, solutions, file management and CVS/SVN issues
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Hi, I'm a newbie and just purchased UEStudio as an upgrade from UltraEdit. I was very interested in the SVN (SubVersion) connection. Now, I'm having a hard time setting it up to work. I have an account that can "see" the repository (which is on my local machine) but can't figure out how to get the commit and other commands to work. Is there anything specific to SVN that I can look at?

Thanks in advance,

dh
I've recently set my UEStudio SVN connection up and I ahve to admit was a little confused to begin with.

I too could see the repository and tried (as you would with other SVN shells) to populate my project area using the Update command.

After you have a default account setup for your repository, restart your computer. I'm not sure what problem I had but when I re-opened UES I was then able to open the "project settings/Version control module manager/checkout" and generate a module list (top level directories form SVN) from which I could then Checkout directories in the Project.

I think it's a bit confusing to use the 'checkout' command as most other SVN shells use the Update comand. A little strange I know but once you get you SVN status indicators showing in your project browser your ready to roll.


HTH :D
You might want to take a look at TortoiseSVN and install that on your PC.

Given that it's written by or at least directly hosted on the same server by the same people that write subVersion itself it's well worth the time.

I must admit I don't recognise "update" as a SVN command at all so I'm a bit confused as to why you would think it's the norm...

Anyways... Tortoise SVN provides a slew more functionality than the current UEStudio function set and is exactly what you need should anything go awry with your SVN working directories.. That and the help files will help clarify information relating to SVN where the current UES help docs are very much lacking...
websnail wrote: I must admit I don't recognise "update" as a SVN command at all so I'm a bit confused as to why you would think it's the norm...


Perhaps you should read the manual then? Basic Work Cycle. Any work you start, should start with an svn update to ensure your working copy is up to date. Prior to a commit you should do an svn update to make sure you have the latest changes merged in and conflicts resolved prior to attempting a comit.

Anyways... Tortoise SVN provides a slew more functionality than the current UEStudio function set and is exactly what you need should anything go awry with your SVN working directories.. That and the help files will help clarify information relating to SVN where the current UES help docs are very much lacking...


Well...

The point of UES is that it's an IDE, thats Integrated Development Enviroment. If you de-integrate the version control, then you have a DDE, Deintegrated Development Environment.

The essential point of an IDE is that you have one interface to do all your development tasks. If the IDE doesn't do that, then just use a set of best of breed applications, which would mean UES wasn't the tool for you, you may as well stick to UE and save the upgrade fee.
I'm not the anti-christ, I just do his work.
Whilst I take your points and I did make a few errors the SVN functionality in UE5 is pretty basic and lacks functionality like the ability to even add a folder to the environment.

Granted I'm still getting to grips with it all but if, as I suspect, the issue is that I don't know which hoops to jump through then that's ok to a point but surely the point of tools like this is that it's intuitive.. Adding a folder shouldn't involve much in the way of hoop jumping when you're used to explorer and the right click option to create such objects.

At present I'm still finding myself using TortoiseSVN to handle some stuff and I hope the integration will improve but right now it's not a proper IDE.

I'm at a bit of a loss why you're coming at me with a "go forth and sin no more n00b" attitude. It's not overly helpful..
I have to agree that this is a very disappointing turn of events. I've lost a significant portion of my day following the few pages that exist in this website for the purpose of getting UEx to integrate with source control. The thing that is most disappointing is that the documents don't match reality. The page says "Go To Project : Version Control System : Import"... which does not exist... why???

Configuring VCS with UEStudio
THEMike wrote: The point of UES is that it's an IDE, thats Integrated Development Enviroment. If you de-integrate the version control, then you have a DDE, Deintegrated Development Environment.

The essential point of an IDE is that you have one interface to do all your development tasks. If the IDE doesn't do that, then just use a set of best of breed applications, which would mean UES wasn't the tool for you, you may as well stick to UE and save the upgrade fee.


To expand on this point: don't use Subversion support as a decision criterion for purchasing or upgrading to UEStudio. UEStudio supports Subversion as long as you're going forward. IDM ignores the concept that one of the great things about version control is the ability to easily examine where you've been, return to a working version after messing things up, and resolve conflicts between multiple contributors. Specifically:

* UEStudio doesn't support subversion's Revert command. This means that you can't bring a single file back to a previous version.
* UEStudio only allows you to see a Diff ("Compare") between the working file and the head. So you can't compare the working file to last week's version.
* UEStudio doesn't support subversion's Log command. This means that you can't even see WHEN previous changes were made.

If I'm wrong about any of this stuff, and there are hidden menus somewhere, I would be delighted to hear it. But UEStudio's shallow Subversion support relegates Subversion to a glorified client-server backup system. In other words: don't uninstall Tortoise.

UPDATE (5/13/2008): Although UEStudio doesn't support Revert, it does have what it calls "Update (Special)" which allows you to specify a past revision. You can then compare this to the head. It's not a spectacularly easy-to-use implementation, and it's still not going to replace a complete Subversion client, but it's better that I originally thought.
Can you tell me how to set up the account settings in UEStudio for subversion? I have been using tortoiseSVN through the file | save as menu, but it would be a little easier to right click and commit.....
In my project files window, all I see are blue question mark icons in front of the file names, where if this front end can access the SVN information, it should show the file as up to date??

What are the proper settings for the account in: Project | Project settings | Manage VCS Modules | Accounts ??

Thank You,
Steve
Having looked at the latest version of UEStudio 09 I find that it's still as pathetic as ever... I say this in the full realisation that I wasted my time and energy 3 years ago when I posted above...

1. The Subversion support is out of date by a year (1.5.2, not 1.6.1 which is current)
2. The manual and help docs still only pay lip service to the use of Subversion.. In fact I don't think it's changed in 3 sodding years
3. The poor implimentation means that you can import and update from repositories and it will "try" to work with it but you don't get icons showing status of any files.
4. I haven't worked out how you setup a VCS module from scratch because the documentation is so utterly lacking. The only working method is to checkout a module in windows explorer using tortoiseSVN (or similar) and then add a folder to your project and hope that you get the Import VCS settings dialogue.


Bottom line... 3 years and it's still what I'd call borderline criminal saying this is subversion compatible.
1. The Subversion support is out of date by a year (1.5.2, not 1.6.1 which is current)


For others having trouble with this, the fix for Windows is fairly easy. Download the latest subversion command-line client from subversion.tigris.org. Find UEStudio's installation directory. Inside that, you'll find a directory called GNU\subversion. Install the new subversion into this directory, overwriting the files that installed with UEStudio. You'll then be able to perform subversion operations from within UEStudio.

3. The poor implimentation means that you can import and update from repositories and it will "try" to work with it but you don't get icons showing status of any files.


Yeah, the loss of the status icons is not a trivial problem, because UEStudio uses the status to determine what you can do with a file via right-click. Once you update the subversion client (so that you can do anything at all), all you can do with individual files is Add.

4. I haven't worked out how you setup a VCS module from scratch because the documentation is so utterly lacking. The only working method is to checkout a module in windows explorer using tortoiseSVN (or similar) and then add a folder to your project and hope that you get the Import VCS settings dialogue.


It's funny you should mention that, because that's how I do it, too! However, I have learned, by trial and error, how to set it up with the UEStudio interface. Completely avoid the "module manager," and note the "Gotchas" in italics: There's an "Accounts/Settings" item that makes everything go more smoothly. Go there and click "Add Account," and enter the protocol (e.g., "svn"), host, username, and repository. Put a / at the beginning of the Repository field, otherwise UEStudio uses the wrong host. Don't bother filling out the password, because you'll be asked for it again anyway.

Then, from the VCS menu, select "Checkout..." For Account, select the one you just made. Leave the Module field blank, unless you have a trunk or want to check out a subdirectory of the repository (and again, use a beginning slash, e.g.: /trunk). When you select your Local Root Directory, make sure you select a directory that already exists, otherwise the checkout will silently fail. Select "New Project" under Add Module ("None" seems to have identical behavior for some reason). The "Use Module Name for Checkout Folder" can usually be unchecked if you've already created your local directory.

It's obvious that the people who code UEStudio (and do such a great job on most other things) don't actually use subversion. But once you get around the totally unnecessary complications, and the obscure things that cause silent failures, it's actually not horribly bad! :) You'll keep TortoiseSVN around to do the heavy lifting, but UEStudio works for doing quick commits without having to open the Windows Explorer folder.

HTH,
Jason
Does anyone know if this will be resolved? I also just updated the SVN dir and now lose all of the status info on my files. I keeps wanting me to "Add".

Thanks in advance,

Shawn
I hope you people mail IDM about these issues as they don't read the forums very much. I don't use UES myself, only UE, so I am not much help.
The previous poster made a good point about contacting IDM. I exchanged about a dozen emails with them a year ago about subversion, but not specifically regarding the icons.

I upgraded to UEStudio 09.30.0.1001 on November 6, 2009. After the upgrade (from 09.10.something), the subversion support is greatly improved. The status icons appear now, which allows me to update, compare, and remove individual files. The icons still aren't always correct; files that are unchanged, and are marked as up-to-date in Tortoise, are marked as changed in UEStudio. But that's largely a cosmetic issue, since the right-click context menu is the same for changed and up-to-date files under version control.

Still not a Tortoise replacement, but they're taking promising steps toward usefulness.
Just thought you might like to know UEStudio 12.10 does not yet support Subversion 1.7, not that earlier versions have more than limited functionality.

If you want an IDE with decent source code control try Eclipse or Visual Studio. TortoiseSVN and AnkSVN are very handy third-party tools.

Seems to me, IDM does not have the resource to provide an ongoing maintenance and upgrade commitment for Subversion.

I now use Visual Studio, which is a breeze compared to UES.

Update: With UEStudio v14.00.0.1012 full support for currently latest Subversion was added to UEStudio.
Well you could use my User Tool which should work with UEStudio, to get Git, Mercurial, SVN via Tortoise.

Of course you could add other VCS's as well...or other tools.

Anyways food for thought.
15 posts Page 1 of 1